4-9 Cav in the News

Thank you Sir, for an excellent write-up on our fantastic 4-9 Cav Troopers!

1st Cavalry News

Black Hawk troops use more than body armor to keep each other safe

By Spc. Alexis Harrison
2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs

            BAGHDAD – For many of the Soldiers in the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, the current 15-month tour in Iraq isn’t their first. For the rest of the Soldiers in the Black Jack Brigade, having well-seasoned leaders can make all the difference.
            While out on the streets every day, Soldiers from Troop B, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, rely on much more than just the individual body armor systems they wear. They depend on each other to make it through daily situations and even the entire deployment.
            Staff Sgt. Angus Robinson from Copperas Cove, Texas, is on his third tour in Iraq. In 2004, he was with the 4th Infantry Division during the initial invasion. Six months later he was reassigned to the 1st Infantry Division to complete his second combat tour.
            Although he was a truck gunner for the majority of his first two tours, he was still a noncommissioned officer who had to look out for what mattered most to him in a time of war: his Soldiers.
            “Before, we had to fight through many places, not necessarily on a daily basis, but it was a regular thing,” he said. “It was an eye-opening experience. It showed me the levels of responsibility you take on for your Soldiers are much different in combat than in a garrison environment.”
            For Robinson, the trips to Baquba and Adiliyah were his first experience in combat        . He would soon after find himself getting promoted to staff sergeant and getting assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division where he knew he’d once again have to lead Soldiers in a combat environment.
            Through several trips to a combat zone, Robinson developed his own techniques of leadership. He borrowed a little from his past NCOs, a little from his experiences and a little from himself to become the leader he is today.        
            Sgt. Patrick Trujillo also has his share of combat experience. He served in the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment out of Fort Polk, La., during its trip to Iraq a few years ago. The Copperas Cove native is now an NCO with  2nd Platoon, Troop B “Night Stalkers.”
            His leadership techniques are similar to those of Robinsons in the sense that he’s taken a lot from his past leaders and he tries to give his Soldiers as much respect as he can.
            He believes the more you show your Soldiers what it takes to be respected the more they’ll respect him. He doesn’t do it through punishments or lucrative awards.
            “Lead by example,” he said. “I always learned more from leaders who didn’t mind getting their hands dirty.”
            More recently, Robinson was again reassigned. This time he didn’t have to go as far as last time. He moved from one platoon to another within the “Black Hawk” Troop.
            Not skipping a beat, Robinson was out on the streets with his team. The area where they patrol in Karkh used to be one of the worst in Baghdad. Robinson credits the hard work by leaders and his fellow Bradley tank crews for cleaning up the neighborhood.
            Both Robinson and Trujillo remarked on how quickly the businesses, traffic and people came back to the area after a few months of being not much more than a ghost town where bodies were being found almost daily.   
            One more thing the two NCOs agreed upon was the satisfaction of seeing their Soldiers thrive and find success in combat.
            “When I see my ‘Joes’ grow into larger roles, it gives me a satisfied feeling,” Robinson said.
            With a rather large grin on his face, Trujillo spouts: “It’s a warm, fuzzy feeling.”
            Robinson said with leadership comes a lot more than giving orders. Besides patrolling a small area north of the International Zone, many responsibilities lie right on the base where they sleep.
            Keeping up with vehicle and weapon maintenance, personal and personnel issues and training are just some of the things Robinson and Trujillo have to keep their Soldiers up to date on.
            Robinson said as trivial as it might seem to the untrained eye, every step of the process every day helps mold young Soldiers into leaders and leaders into better leaders.
            “In order to see [Soldiers] grow as individuals and leaders, you have to give them a sense of ownership. You have to allow them to take responsibility to the next level.”
            Robinson remarked that several of his Soldiers are itching for action. He can understand why, but he knows that patrolling a safe neighborhood is much easier than patrolling a volatile one.
            One such Soldier is Spc. Ashley Hall. The Ardmore, Ala., native says that many of the challenges they face boil down to something much more simple than expected.   
            He said that being out in sector isn’t necessarily the toughest part of the job. The true challenge lies in what’s expected of him on a daily basis. Trujillo feels the same way.
            “It’s a big challenge having guys’ lives in your hands,” he said. “It’s kind of scary but kind of satisfying in the same sense.”

Houston native Pfc. Michael Anderson, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, watches the street while Chicago native Staff Sgt. Michael Jenkins hands out cards with phone numbers to call in case of an emergency to residents of Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)
Houston native Pfc. Michael Anderson, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, watches the street while Chicago native Staff Sgt. Michael Jenkins hands out cards with phone numbers to call in case of an emergency to residents of Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)

Chicago native Staff Sgt. Michael Jenkins, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, hands out cards with numbers to call in case of an emergency or to give tips on suspicious activity to Iraqi men waiting outside a post office in Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)
Chicago native Staff Sgt. Michael Jenkins, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, hands out cards with numbers to call in case of an emergency or to give tips on suspicious activity to Iraqi men waiting outside a post office in Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)


Chicago native Staff Sgt. Michael Jenkins of 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, greets an Iraqi soldier with whom he used to man a checkpoint with during a dismount to check on security measures June 7. He and his section from the 2nd Platoon “Night Stalkers,” Troop B, now patrol Baghdad’s Karkh District. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)

Copperas Cove, Texas, native Staff Sgt. Angus Robinson, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, checks out some newly-reopened businesses while Brownsville, Texas, native Staff Sgt. Roberto Reyna watches his back during a patrol in Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)
Copperas Cove, Texas, native Staff Sgt. Angus Robinson, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, checks out some newly-reopened businesses while Brownsville, Texas, native Staff Sgt. Roberto Reyna watches his back during a patrol in Baghdad’s Karkh District June 7.  (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alexis Harrison, 2nd BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs)

Keeping them all in our prayers…

(a note to my gorgeous son: Phone Home! We miss you and I need to hear your voice.  )

Seriously Son, stay safe. Luv you WAY MUCH!

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4 Responses to 4-9 Cav in the News

  1. “truck gunner for the majority of his first two tours” swinging that 50 cal doing his duty; maybe not initially a grunt, but where’s he going to run.

    ‘“Lead by example,” he said. “I always learned more from leaders who didn’t mind getting their hands dirty.”’ The only type of leadership I can/could follow. He didn’t always have to get dirty, but knowing that he wouldn’t hesitate was all I needed. I got moved around a bit until that match was made (I was lucky), that’s when I truly started becoming a soldier.

    Not all NCOs are like this; but it’s the ones that are that make the Army as effective as it is.

    “a note to my gorgeous son: Phone Home! We miss you and I need to hear your voice.”

    Stop, you’re embarrassing the boy…..NOT!!!!

    God Bless

  2. Yup, you can learn a lot from your superiors. In fact, I often learned the most from the worst NCO’s. I learned what NOT to do…

    Cheers

    P.S. – I hope your lil’ trooper remembers to call soon. Nothing like a worried parent…

  3. devildog6771 says:

    What a great post. I don’t know why but I have real special feeling for the Night Stalkers and the 2nd BCT. Those troops “rock!”

    E.T. phone home, lol!

  4. cavmom says:

    Don’t worry Blandy Urbane. As hard as I try, I no longer think I can embarrass him any further. (but, I will continue to put forth the effort. He is worth it.) 😀

    The 4-9 Cav is an excellent group of Soldiers. From what I hear, the officers are right in the middle of it. Capt. Gilliam was out on patrol many times with his men.

    https://cavmom.wordpress.com/2007/05/30/back-in-iraq-4-9-cav-news/

    Doc ~ My brother tells me the same thing. It is all a learning experience. Thankfully you are sharp enough to gather good information from a bad situation. 😉

    DevilDog! Any luck with that GI Joe gear for Cami-Dog?

    All anyone has to do is say the words 1st Cav and I snap to attention. Throw in 2nd BCT and 4-9 Cav and I begin to squirm in my seat. I have a definite prejudice for those guys. 🙂

    I have sent out a ‘Bat Signal” to my L’il Trooper. (Son, don’t make me break out the ransom notes again)

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