A “Four-Dimensional War”

Every day our troops are showing more signs of the progess in Iraq! The nay-sayers cannot continue to turn their heads and pretend that we are not making a positive difference in the Middle East.

1st Cavalry News 35th Street Market open for business

By Pfc. Nathaniel Smith
4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs

            BAGHDAD – Seven weeks ago, the citizens of East Doura couldn’t walk down 35th Street. Seven weeks ago, there would have been an explosive or gunfire waiting for them.
            Seven weeks ago, the Raiders weren’t in the area.
            That’s how long the Soldiers of Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division have been overseeing the security of the 35th Street market in southern Baghdad’s Rashid District.
            In those few weeks, approximately 20 shops have already opened up, and there hasn’t been a single explosive attack.
            Capt. Nicholas Cook, the commander of Troop A, 1-4 Cav. from Lansing, Mich., said while the northern section of the street has become a hub of economic activity, the unit is not ready to sit back on its haunches.
            “We want the whole street to come back,” he said. “Hopefully more businesses will open up on the southern end of 35th Street, and they’ll continue to open up.”
            Sgt. 1st Class Gannon Edgy, a platoon sergeant with Trp A, 1-4 Cav. from Brunswick, Ga., said his Soldiers are noticing the difference.
            “When we first took over, people didn’t want to stop and talk to us,” he said. “Now, locals seek us out to talk to us.”
            Capt. William Johnson, a business analyst with the 4th IBCT’s embedded Provincial Reconstruction Team from Minnetonka, Minn., said success at the 35th Street Market coincides with the overall strategy in Iraq.
            “Economics and governance are important within the (Counter-Insurgency) strategy that Gen. (David) Petraeus developed to allow the Iraqis to stand on their own,” Johnson said. “Ultimately, if we develop the governance capacity for the Iraqis, they can govern themselves in a responsible fashion.
            “Then we can go home, and equivalent to that, if we can build up the economy, we can put people to work, people won’t be doing things that are detrimental to themselves or U.S. troops.”
            In an area where Al Qaeda had a foothold, where the terrorists could move unabated, citizens of Iraq can now find real estate offices, restaurants, auto parts stores, and computer stores in the market. Cook said this would not be the case without the relationships his Soldiers have developed.
            “They work hard with the people, they talk with the people, they make people feel that we are not strangers, and that we are actually part of the community,” Cook said. “Just making them feel that we are there for their security. The troopers worked really hard to become part of this community.”
            For leaders like Edgy, the type of fight has shifted dramatically in a few short years, and therefore, so must the tactics.
            “(This deployment) is a more three-dimensional, four-dimensional war,” he said. “It went from knowing the enemy to having to hunt and fight the enemy. It’s become an intelligence battlefield.
            “It’s like your own hometown. You have to know what’s going on.”
             Johnson said 1-4 Cav’s hard work has paid off, but there’s still more to do.
            “We are making some success, but given more time we can potentially grow our success,” he said. “For example, (the success) we’ve had in Doura Market to other economic areas within the sector.”
            Edgy said to grow the success on 35th Street, the merchants must have a voice in the happenings in their neighborhood.
            “Letting shop owners know the plan and ask their opinion,” he said. “Making them feel involved is the key.”

Sgt. 1st Class Gannon Edgy, a platoon sergeant with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Brunswick, Ga., checks out a local’s wares at the 35th Street Market in southern Baghdad July 12. More than 50 new shops have opened since 1-4 Cav has taken over the area of operations. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Smith, 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs)

Sgt. 1st Class Gannon Edgy, a platoon sergeant with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Brunswick, Ga., checks out a local’s wares at the 35th Street Market in southern Baghdad July 12. More than 50 new shops have opened since 1-4 Cav has taken over the area of operations. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Smith, 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs)

Capt. Nicholas Cook, the commander of Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Lansing, Mich., talks with an Iraqi vendor at the 35th Street Market in southern Baghdad July 12. Economic development is one of the essential elements of Gen. David Petraeus’ Counter-Insurgency strategy in Iraq. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Smith, 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs)

Capt. Nicholas Cook, the commander of Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Lansing, Mich., talks with an Iraqi vendor at the 35th Street Market in southern Baghdad July 12. Economic development is one of the essential elements of Gen. David Petraeus’ Counter-Insurgency strategy in Iraq. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Smith, 4th IBCT, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs)

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4 Responses to A “Four-Dimensional War”

  1. 2008voter says:

    this is my first visit on your blog and i am absolutely thrilled. this is the blog what i was looking for this is what i will take a criteria of morality and truth. Thank you for what you are doing and I am so tied to hear leftists -socialist propaganda that without blogs like yours it just difficult to carry on. I am not religious person myself but with all sincerity saying to you: God Bless you and all your family , thank you all of you for being who you are . I am your reader form this moment on . keep it up, please!

  2. As a theoretical physicist working on dimensional particle interaction, I was quite excited by the title, “A Four Dimensional War.”

    Needless to say, however it was not what I had initially thought it was… 🙂

    “Economics and governance are important within the (Counter-Insurgency) strategy that Gen. (David) Petraeus developed to allow the Iraqis to stand on their own,” Johnson said. “Ultimately, if we develop the governance capacity for the Iraqis, they can govern themselves in a responsible fashion.
    “Then we can go home, and equivalent to that, if we can build up the economy, we can put people to work, people won’t be doing things that are detrimental to themselves or U.S. troops.”

    If I am to understand correctly what Johnson is implying, I am amazed to hear that economics and governance were not initially at the forefront of the redevelopment strategy in Iraq.

    Tell me it isn’t so…

    Cheers

  3. cavmom says:

    2008Voter ~ There are many aspects of the war. Unfortunately the media does not choose to share the good that comes out of a bad situation. There really is so much good in the world. If we focus on only the negative aspects, we can quickly become disenchanted with life.

    I am not a big fan of war (who is?) But, it is easy to see the positive effect our men and women are having in weeding out the terrorists and helping the Iraqi people to reestablish their lives.

  4. cavmom says:

    Sorry to mislead you Doc. It is a catchy title isn’t it? 😉

    To me, it appears as if the war was SNAFU’d in the beginning stages. We had intentions to go to Iraq, rid the country of Sadam, and let the people enjoy a free life.

    Many holes were created that were quickly filled with murderous thugs (Al Q) and such.

    Of course I am not an expert on the Middle East and do not pretend to be… It appears the people lived years being told what to do, how to live, and are now trying to figure out these things for themselves.

    I have no doubt that they will iron out the many wrinkles, as soon as they figure out how to plug in the iron and who should do the ironing.

    We just need to stay in place long enough to let the Iraqi people gain self confidence and strength over outside influences.

    Not sure how they are going to work out their secretarion differences.

    I am thankful, as is the rest of the world, that it is not up to me!

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