We Shall Never Forget!

February 28, 2007

HELLO FRIENDS AND FAMILY

TODAY AT ABOUT 5:00 P.M. WILL BE TWO YEARS THAT TITO PASSED

AND IN REMEMBERING HIM WE ARE ASKING YOU ALL TO SOMETIME 

 DURING THE DAY TO SAY A LITTLE PRAY FOR ALL THAT HAVE SERVED

 AND THAT ARE SERVING. FOR TITO WE ASK THAT YOU BURN A CANDLE

OR TURN ON A LIGHT OR PLACE AN AMERICAN FLAG SOMEWHERE IN

YOUR HOME. MAY THE 3000 PLUS SOLDIERS THAT HAVE PERISHED

 NEVER BE FORGOTTEN AND MAY GOD BLESS THE SOLDIERS THAT ARE

STILL FIGHTING.

GOD BLESS YOU

RET SFC NEGRON & MILDRED NEGRON

To the families of those

who paid the Ultimate Sacrifice

for our freedoms…

We Shall Never Forget!

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Wednesday Hero

February 28, 2007

This Weeks Soldier Was Requested By Echo9er

Sgt. Maj. Brent Jurgersen

Sgt. Maj. Brent “The Rock” Jurgersen
Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 4th U.S. Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division

Active Duty Not even two near-death encounters deterred Sgt. Maj. Brent Jurgerson’s passion and eagerness to serve his country and lead his troops back home.Jurgersen celebrated his second “alive day” anniversary January 26, 2007. It was a day of mixed emotions for him because on that same day two years ago he was given a second chance to live. It was a day that changed his life forever.While on patrol in Ad Dyuliah, Iraq, two rocket-propelled grenades struck his Humvee. The explosion killed his gunner and left Jurgersen fighting for his life, flat-lining twice on the operating table in Balad.

Afterwards, during a promotion ceremony in August of 2006, Jurgersen was selected for a command sergeant major appointment. Becoming the first full limb amputee student to attend the academy.

You can read the rest of Sgt. Maj. Jurgersen’s story here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.
We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. If you would like to participate in honoring the brave men and women who serve this great country, you can find out how by going here.


1st Cav News

February 27, 2007

Gunmen can’t stop medical operation

By Staff Sgt. Angela McKinzie
2-10 Mtn. Public Affairs

AL TARAQ, Iraq – Terrorists commonly use scare tactics to disrupt the everyday lives of others; however, their tactics were unsuccessful during a recent medical operation.

Soldiers from the 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment and the 210th Brigade Support Battalion, both units of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), conducted a medical operation at the Ahmed Suhel School in Al Taraq, Iraq Feb. 22.

Although the school offered a comfortable atmosphere, terrorists tried to disrupt the day’s activities with small arms fire and a rocket-propelled grenade attack. But the medical operation continued and Iraqis still received care.

“If we shut this down then the terrorist would have won,” said Capt. Shane Finn, the commander of Company C, 4-31st and native of Clinton, N.Y. “All they are trying to do is stop the operation – and they are not going to do that.”

Local residents nationals were seen from everything from coughs to burns, but some cases could not be treated with basic medical care. Seventy-five received treatment.

No one was injured during the terrorist attack.

“I am very happy that the Americans have helped me,” said Kaild Hamed, an Iraqi teen, as he watched Williams bandage his wound. “They do a good job and they are my friends.”

Soldiers taking part in the mission understand the importance of medical operations.

“We live in Al Taraq and have a small aid station here,” said Pfc. Chadwick Williams, a native of Spokane, Wash., who serves as a medic with 4-31.

“Every day there are people who come to our aid station requesting medical care, but since I am not a doctor I cannot do too much for them. It is good to have medical operations because there are doctors on site to treat the Iraqis,” he said.

The site selection for medical operations is also important.

“We chose to have the medical operation at the school so that we could get people comfortable with being at the school,” said 1st Sgt. David Simpson, the senior noncommissioned officer with Co. C, 4-31st and a native of Des Moines, Iowa. “The school offers a friendlier atmosphere for these types of operations.”

The unit is planning more medical operations in the area.

The operation must go on
(Photo by Staff Sgt. Angela McKinzie 2-10 Mtn. Public Affairs)
Pfc. Chadwick Williams, with the 4th Bn., 31st Inf. Regt., 2nd BCT, 10th Mtn. Div., treats an Iraqi boy during a medical operation.


Fight For Me!

February 27, 2007

 Please take a moment to read the words of this band at Terri’s site:

 A Soldier’s Mind 

They moved me to tears this morning.

America does get it!


Support!!!

February 26, 2007

Ted Nugent – Star Spangled Banner Live

Mr. Nugent (Nuge to many) has stepped up and offered his support to the brave men of the 4-9.  He is helping me with a project and encouraging others to stand up and voice their support.

Thank you so very much!


… More Good News Friday!

February 23, 2007

1st Cavalry News

Security patrol helps young burn victim   

By Capt. David Levasseur
2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div. PAO

            BAGHDAD – While patrolling the streets in the Kadamiyah district of western Baghdad Feb. 16, Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment were approached by a local man and his seven year old son. 

The child had been badly burned in an accident about a week prior.

            The man had immediately taken his son to a local hospital for treatment.  Since that time, though, the wound had become infected and the man was concerned for his son’s well being.

            Pvt. Robert Connet, a medic from Fort Wayne, Ind., and Spc. Marcus Wagner, from Anaheim, Calif., both from Company D, 1-325th AIR, immediately started treatment for the child. 

            After removing the old bandages and inspecting the wound they applied new bandages.

            The patrol then continued on their way, now followed by a small boy with a new bandage, a piece of candy and a big smile.

 

An Iraqi boy gives the peace sign as Pvt. Robert Connet, a medic from Fort Wayne, Ind., and Sgt. Marcus Wagner, from Anaheim, Calif, both of Company D, 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, treat his burned arm Feb. 16 in Baghdad’s Kadamiyah district.  The unit was patrolling the neighborhood when the child’s father flagged them down, asking for assistance.  The medic inspected the wound and applied a new bandage.  (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Chris Defiori, Company D, 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment)


Good News Friday

February 23, 2007

1st Cavalry News

Medical operation helps COP Callahan Soldiers build trust

By Sgt. Michael Garrett
7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

            BAGHDAD – When Spc. Michael Benusa needs to do his job, it’s usually a bad thing. As a medic for Company B, 2nd Battalion, 325th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, the last thing Benusa hopes for is to be needed to treat one of his fellow Soldiers.

            But, that wasn’t the case on a recent trip out side of Combat Outpost Callahan, where Benusa’s company has set up residence.

            “We revisited some people with health issues we identified during our initial cordon and search of the area,” the Duluth, Minn., native said. “We went to check on their progress and bring them some medication they may have trouble attaining on their own.”

            The first stop was at a home where an Iraqi girl had a skin condition.

            “The little girl at the first house had circumfurial eczema around her eyes and mouth,” Benusa said. “We gave them some hydrocortisone last time and some instructions on how to use it.  I was really surprised at how much her condition had improved.  You couldn’t have asked for better results in the United States, or any other country for that matter.”

            Benusa was glad to be able to put his skills to work and not be treating a wounded Soldier.

            “It feels good to be needed, and not have one of your guys really messed up,” Benusa said. “Usually, I don’t have anything to do, and that’s a good thing, because if I am busy that would be bad news for everyone else.”

            Even though this mission had a different purpose than what an infantry platoon might normally encounter, it was not time to let your guard down, said Spc. Adam Gregory, an infantryman from Madison, Mo.

            “Every time you leave the gate you have to have your game face on,” Gregory said. “You never know what’s going to happen.  All it takes is one guy to pop around a corner to get you.”

            The opportunity to help the residents in the area is a way the Soldiers from COP Callahan are trying to build a relationship with the Iraqis so they can help provide better security to the area.

            “It shows them another side of us,” Gregory said. “It shows them we are not here to shoot up their town.  We’re here to help, and we hope that leads to information; information we can use to help clean up the streets for them, so they can have a better life.”

            After visiting the first house, the Soldiers moved on to the next house where they had first encountered a man who had suffered a stroke. His family had asked the medic if there was anything they could do to help him. Benusa did all he could, but it was ultimately up to the family to make sure the man got the care he needed.

            “The second individual we visited today had suffered a stroke,” Benusa said. “There really isn’t anything we can do for him. There is no medication that just makes the effects of a stroke go away. It’s going to take some time for his condition to show any progress.”

            Benusa gave the man’s family instructions on how to help rehabilitate the man’s mobility in the limbs affected by the stroke.

            Providing medical assistance for those who need, Gregory said, is what makes the deployment worthwhile.

            “It felt great to help these people, it gives us a sense of purpose,” said Gregory. “We can go out there five times a day, but to actually help someone makes it feel worth leaving your family for.”

                    

Duluth, Minn., native Spc. Michael Benusa, a medic with Company B, 2nd Battalion, 325th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, explains to an English-speaking Iraqi girl how to apply medication to her younger sister. The young girl had been suffering from a skin condition around her mouth and eyes. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Michael Garrett, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)